Memory and sense of self may play more of a role in autism than we thought

Ut fringilla placerat arcu. Phasellus imperdiet.

It’s well-known that those with autism spectrum disorders including Asperger’s syndrome develop difficulties with social communication and show stereotyped patterns of behaviour. Less well-studied but equally characteristic features are a weaker sense of self and mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. These are connected with a weaker ability to recall personal memories, known as autobiographical memory.

Research now suggests that autobiographical memory’s role in creating a sense of self may be a key element behind the development of autistic characteristics.

Autism is much more common in men than in women, to the extent that one theory of autism explains it as the result of an “extreme male” brain, where autistic females are assumed to be more masculinised. Historically, however, research participants have been predominantly male, which has left gaps in our knowledge about autism in women and girls. Psychologists have suggested that the criteria used for diagnosing autism may suffer from a male bias, meaning that many women and girls go undiagnosed until much later in life, if at all

Read full article here

August 10, 2016

2 responses on "Memory and sense of self may play more of a role in autism than we thought"

  1. Here is a non-admin comment.

    It has multiple lines, some code, and a bit more text.

  2. Howdy! This is an admin comment.

Leave a Message

top